Helping Us Tell the Army’s Story

Today’s Soldier Profile comes from one of our military bloggers/online journalists, Charles “Chuck” Simmins. Chuck is the editor and publisher of America’s North Shore Journal and has been an active participate in our bloggers roundtable program since its’ inception.

Check out an excerpt from his series titled, “Our Best.”

As a young non-commissioned officer, U.S. Army Sgt. Elizabeth Fortkamp enjoys an enviable position. One of her

U.S. Army Sgt. Elizabeth Fortkamp, a senior medic with the Fort Knox, Ky.-based Company C, 201st Brigade Support Battalion, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 1st Infantry Division, Task Force Duke, and a native of Coldwater, Ohio, examines the ear canal of a soldier at her unit's medical clinic, Forward Operating Base Salerno, July 19. Photo by Staff Sgt. John Zumer

biggest supporters happens to be her battalion commander, yet as far as Fortkamp is concerned, the feelings of professional respect in her unit have always been a two-way street.

Fortkamp, a senior medic with the Fort Knox, Ky.-based Company C, 201st Brigade Support Battalion, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 1st Infantry Division, Task Force Duke, is a five-year Army veteran presently serving in eastern Afghanistan on her second deployment.

Raised in a large family in Coldwater, Ohio, she is the fifth of seven children. Fortkamp cites that circumstance as one of the most influential reasons for joining the Army.

“Coming from a large family, I wanted to get out and be my own person.”

Three years as a certified nursing assistant at an Ohio nursing home before joining the Army convinced her she wanted to remain in the medical profession.

“I’ve always loved medicine and helping people,” said Fortkamp, adding that “seeing what’s wrong and being able to fix it” from a medical perspective always intrigued her.

As the senior enlisted member for the 201st BSB medical clinic at Forward Operating Base Salerno, Fortkamp supervises a team that fluctuates between three to six soldiers depending on patient numbers and mission assignments. That supervision consists of sick call duties, organizing training opportunities for the companies of the 201st BSB, and looking for ways to increase the skill sets of the soldiers working under her.

Read entire piece here.

Thank you to Sgt. Fortkamp for all that you do and thank you to Chuck for helping us tell the U.S. Army’s story!

Army Strong!